Diamonds in the Rough ‘n Tumble Webternets: What Med-people of Conscience Are Blogging (Part 4/4)

Posted by – August 19, 2014

Part 4 of 4 of the series When Life and Death is “A Matter of Policy”

For part 2, I wrote an overview of some of the bad things that have occurred when people in medical settings follow policy strictly even when it leads to horrible consequences, or in the case of Eric Garner, they don’t follow anything (aside from what the cops said) with horrible results.  In part 3, I covered the psychology of obeying.
For the last part, I look at what some med-people of conscience have said about obeying bad top-down mandates, the VA kerfuffle, and related issues as our medical ecosystems undergo tectonic shifts in the U.S. with very mixed, highly debatable, results.

I’ve always been drawn to posts blogged by nurses, doctors, RTs, et al…

Cartoon description: Just like the iconic photograph of five helmeted WW2 veterans working together to plant an American flag in a muddy clearing on Iwo Jima, but in this iteration, the five famous GIs struggle to foist forward a tower of VA paperwork instead.

“VA Red Tape” by John Darkow, Columbia Daily Tribune.

and for understanding the complexities of the overlapping universes (univerii? the multiverse?) of health care models and their rules and regulations, the medical bloggers out there are invaluable.

Dr. Marc-David Munk, blogging from his unique vantage point as “Chief Medical Officer” of an ACO in Central Massachusetts, explains the paradox behind the epic fails seen at the VA and other “big healthcare” institutions: the more top-down mandates, rigid accountability rules, and abstract “performance metrics” are imposed, the more you accelerate crapification¹, enable unaccountability and cooking the books, remove front-line staff’s decision-making powers, and lessen patient-focused medicine.
Dr. Munk deftly unpacks the weirdity:

It’s a common story to anyone who has been around big healthcare: senior management attempts to respond to a business problem by implementing a series of high level mandates that remove front-line management’s ability to think and make operational decisions.

…A cascade of things happens with high-level mandates: Senior management becomes obsessive about setting and measuring metrics. The degrees of freedom for people to make patient-focussed care decisions diminishes and every manager along the way starts to feel squeezed on all sides. Some find work-arounds such as the secret set of “waiting lists” kept off the books at the VA and the false reports generated by some.

See the entire blog post: The VA, Laws on Healthcare and the Dangerous Business of Replacing Front-Line Thinking with Corporate Mandates

Dr. Roy Poses, blogging fearlessly at Health Care Renewal, takes on the issue of top-down mandates from corporate managers with uncommon boldness, questioning the ability of the MBA managerial class to understand medical care long-haul at all, even pondering the role corporate psychopaths helming our big health care conglomerates might be playing in the present state of affairs. I applaud you, Dr. Poses! Your candor and insight (and pure gutsiness) is desperately needed. PLEASE keep bloggering on – KBO!

Dr. Michael Hein (linked to by Dr. Munk) sheds light on the 90% of the iceberg underneath the VA scandal we’re not seeing or addressing: the crisis of woefully scarce primary care.  Most civilians wait much longer than 14 days for an initial primary care appointment; 30 days if you’re lucky, up to 6-9 months depending on which part of the country you’re in.
Dr. Hein also linked to the always insightful OB/GYN Dr. Jen Gunter reining in “metrics madness” at the VA and elsewhere with her lasso of truth.

I hope to blog more about the issue of the supply of health care in the future.  The Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion (see my post explaining the Medicaid expansionboost access to insurance (and ostensibly health care) without a corresponding effort to expand the supply of doctors, nurses, hospitals, and so forth.  Though I disagree with libertarian sources like Reason Magazine on most issues excepting civil liberties and bad, counterintuitive regulations being bad, I gotta give ‘em a big tip of the hat for addressing the supply of health care and the many unnecessary choke-points in the supply pipeline head-on: Video: How to Grow the Supply of Health Care RIGHT NOW!

Paul Levy, a former hospital CEO whose bloggings at Not Running A Hospital led me to Dr. Munk’s blog to begin with, is running down part of the health care supply problem: monopoly. Embedded in the Bay State, Not Running A Hospital is giving much needed scrutiny to the recent deal with Partners HealthCare and the Attorney General Martha Coakley, the behemoth corporation that owns Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, both affiliated with Harvard, allowing them to eat South Shore Hospital and related doctors’ practices and ultimately become more scary and behemoth-y, the prices even gougier.  “…it cannot be in the public interest to permit a dominant provider to become still more dominant” Levy points out in his letter to the trial court set to rule on Coakley’s “anti-trust settlement”—read his full letter here.
He deserves not only an award for activism but an award for blog journalism, as he has pulled together an excellent collection of factual information about Partners HealthCare and the ongoing anti-trust dispute in a way spin-doctored news media don’t, and examined things, like Gov. Patrick’s unserious “wait and see” lip-service, that the news media won’t.

And this brings us full circle back to the concepts I began this series with: rules, regulations and policies decided in boardrooms, courtrooms and back-rooms have an enormous affect on all our lives, especially when you’re a “patient.”

Like Lambert Strether at (terrific blog critical of big finance) naked capitalism wrote, the way the corporations code their systems—the computer code, the 1s and 0s—increasingly is becoming the law. Notably in cases of big banks’ mortgage databases that perpetrated mass-scale fraud, the courts just assessed penalties per offense, “cost of doin’ bidness” for banks, and the big databases roll on, slapped on the wrist but essentially made legal after the fact.

Step one: Code the system. Step two: Rewrite the law to match the code, and grant immunity. It is, after all, better to ask for forgiveness than permission.

Code is law.

See the whole post here: “Code is law.” Literally. | naked capitalism

It’s symptomatic of a weak state and broken legislative branch(es). More and more, we need to lobby the corporations, the guys who control “the code” and the related bureaucracies—my focus is medical bureaucracy —just as much or more than the public officials who ostensibly run things in a democracy.
We’ll need good bloggers, good advocates, good blog-journalists and blog-activists. The aforementioned blogs are great examples of what that can look like.  I hope to be a part of it.

Nick

 

Part 1: the introduction/weird ventilator rule

Part 2: Paramedics, the VA and obedience gone wrong

Part 3: The Milgram experiment, the tendency to obey and medical contexts

 

Footnote:
1. crapification – coined by Yves Smith (nom de blag of Susan Webber, head of naked capitalism) to describe the ever crappier quality of consumer goods and services as everything inexplicably succumbs to “the race to the bottom”… “…long-overdue and largely futile backlash against the crapification of almost everything“…

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